Branko Zivotin - Croatian astrologer, chiromant

"The Truth about the gay population"(2004)

The book is predictive and contain predictions about the future of gay population. Will Christianity and the clergy accept homosexuality as something normal and when? What will the priests proclaim about the gay people to all people. The influence of the planets is described and which of the palnets brings gay marriages and open marriages. The book reveals the informations about gay life and relatioships but also which sexual behavior is impersonation of evil and what kind of God's punishment is coming for such behavior.

"So shall the clergy finally accept homosexuality as normal." I wrote the prediction in my book in 2004. After 12 years of the prediction the Pope himself announced that The church and Christians must say sorry to homosexuals.

"The Truth about the gay population"(2004)

The first edition of the book (croatian language) was published on 27 January 2004 by author astrologer Branko Zivotin and quickly sold out. The book in english language was published in 2015 with a limited number of copies. The citation was posted on 06 February 2006 on the official site of the author.

The fact is that people were very much shocked after the release of my book The Truth about the gay population (2004), started a scandal in particular by astrologers who could not accept the truth. I received humiliation from the astrologers and advice that they, LGBT people are all morons and perverted. When I wanted to publish a text concerning the gay community I received censorship, and an order that such things in their journals will never be published. With astrological magazine editors I had conflicts because they were full of misunderstanding for this subject. Astrology very nicely describes the life of gay people but astrologers are making their clans which propagate the psychological astrology, no forecast, no prediction of event, no truth.

The church must say sorry to homosexuals

Over 260 Catholic theologians, particularly from Germany, Switzerland and Austria, signed in January and February 2011 a memorandum, called Church 2011, which said that the Church's esteem for marriage and celibacy "does not require the exclusion of people who responsibly live out love, faithfulness, and mutual care in same-sex partnerships".

Since the end of 2011, the Catholic Church has witnessed a growing trend of Catholic leaders speaking out in support of same-sex relationships, civil unions, and marriage equality:

2012 Cardinal Rainer Maria Woelki of Berlin, Germany, told a major Catholic conference “When two homosexuals take responsibility for one another, if they deal with each other in a faithful and long-term way, then you have to see it in the same way as heterosexual relationships.” Woekli acknowledged that the church saw the relationship between a man and a woman as the basis for creation, but added that it was time to think further about the church’s attitude toward same sex relationships.

2013 Cardinal Christoph Schonborn of Vienna Austria: “There can be same-sex partnerships and they need respect, and even civil law protection.”The Cardinal Archbishop of Vienna is expressing openness to legal recognition of homosexual unions, appearing to put him at odds with Magisterial teaching. In a talk at Britain’s National Gallery on Monday, Cardinal Christoph Schönborn defended the traditional definition of marriage, but urged “respect” for same-sex relationships, reports the UK Catholic paper The Tablet.

2016 Cardinal Reinhard Marx the German cardinal, the member of the council of nine cardinals chosen by Pope Francis to advise him has said the Catholic Church should apologise to the gay community for its scandalous and terrible treatment of them, which had not changed until “very recently”. Speaking in Dublin, Cardinal Reinhard Marx said: “The history of homosexuals in our societies is very bad because we’ve done a lot to marginalise [them].” As church and society “we’ve also to say ‘sorry, sorry’ ”.“We have to respect the decisions of people. We have to respect also, as I said in the first synod on the family, some were shocked but I think it’s normal, you cannot say that a relationship between a man and a man and they are faithful [that] that is nothing, that has no worth,” he said. link

2016 Pope Francis has said the Roman Catholic Church owes gay people an apology for the way it has treated them. On a flight from Armenia to Rome, the pontiff recalled Christian teaching and said: "I will repeat what the catechism of the Church says, that they [gay people] should not be discriminated against, they should be respected, accompanied pastorally.” "I think that the Church not only should apologise... to a gay person whom it offended but it must also apologise to the poor as well, to the women who have been exploited, to children who have been exploited by [being forced to] work. It must apologise for having blessed so many weapons." link

Speaking to reporters on Monday 29th July 2013 during a plane journey back to the Vatican following his trip to Brazil, the global Catholic leader said:

"A gay person who is seeking God, who is of good will – well, who am I to judge him?" the pope said. "The Catechism of the Catholic Church explains this very well. It says one must not marginalize these persons, they must be integrated into society. The problem isn't this (homosexual) orientation – we must be like brothers and sisters.

Recognition of same-sex unions in Europe

Currently 28 of the 50 countries and 4 of the 6 dependent territories in Europe recognize some type of same-sex unions, among them a majority of members of the European Union. As of December 2015, thirteen European countries legally recognize and perform same-sex marriage, namely Belgium, Denmark, Finland (effective from 2017), France, Iceland, Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Twenty-one European countries legally recognize some form of civil union, namely Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. San Marino only allows immigration and cohabitation of a citizen's partner. Several countries are currently considering same-sex union recognition.

Same-sex marriage is not recognized in several European countries and in addition marriage is defined as a union solely between a man and a woman in the constitutions of Armenia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Hungary, Latvia, Moldova, Montenegro, Poland, Slovakia and Ukraine. Laws governing lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) rights are complex in the Americas, and acceptance of LGBT persons varies widely. Same-sex marriages have been legal in Canada nation wide since 2005, in the United States nation wide since 2015. Currently, Canada and the United States are the only countries in North America that allow same-sex couples to marry everywhere within their boundaries.

On June 26, 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges that a fundamental right to marry is guaranteed to same-sex couples by the Fourteenth Amendment, and that states must allow same-sex marriage. Currently 6 of the 12 sovereign countries in South America recognize some type of same-sex unions. Same-sex marriage is currently legal in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Uruguay. An additional two countries have a form of civil union or registered partnership, namely Chile and Ecuador.